Category Archives: Bible Studies

Getting the most out of your daily Bible study.

As promised earlier, here two methods of how to get the most out of your daily Bible study.

Method 1:

This method is easy and can be applied equally by children, youth, adults, students, professors and pastors. I learned it recently from a mentor and friend.

The method can be summarised in 4 simple steps:

1. Read the scripture. Re-read it. Then either write it out or paraphrase it in writing.

2. What does the scripture say? (i.e. write down, what the scripture says to you about God, about yourself, about humanity, … .)

3. What will you obey? (i.e. write down very specifically “I will …….. by ……”.)

4. Whom will you share this with? (i.e. write down very specifically “I will share …………… with…………….. by ……………” .)

Do not underestimate the impact this method will have on your reading of scripture! Specifically the 3rd and 4th point, make it a method of high impact, provided you have someone keeping you accountable to it!

Method 2:

This method takes time. It is good for intensive Bible study. (I have learned about this method in an STI seminar in Stellenbosch, South Africa and have since profited from this method a lot in my private Bible studies).

These are the basic steps that are followed:

1. prioritising the text: read the text, rather than comments of others first.

2. getting the big picture: understand the big picture, before zooming in on the details.

3. respecting the original context: the significance of the text in the ‘here & now’ is dependent on the meaning of the text in the ‘there & then’.

4. using progressing repetition: read the text repeatedly and progressively add more contextual information.

5. Interpretation: progress of elimination.

To clarify these five steps, allow me to do so on a very easy example:

1. Read the whole book of Jude (preferably without verse numbers, sub titles/headings, and as one solid text). Read it again. DO NOT READ footnotes etc.

2. Read it again and then try and categorize the text portions yourself, giving it your own outline.

3. Now read the outline on Jude in a study Bible. Then read the text again. Do you see how it changes?

4. Read the comments of a study Bible on Jude, then re-read the book of Jude again.

With all this reading you will have gained a fully new understanding of the book. You will have experienced the joy of discovering meaning behind a text and will have memorized some content of it even.

When I say this method takes time, you now probably see why. Doing this with a short book like the book of Jude is fairly easy. Doing it with the book of Acts can be somewhat time consuming. Still it is definitely worthwhile doing so!

Let me know how you are finding these methods. Feel free to post comments of your experiences on FB or here in the comment section.

May God bless you abundantly!

 

How to interpret the Bible

(the content consists partially of notes I have taken at an STI seminar in Stellenbosch, South Africa)

I have often been asked why it is that we seem to take some portions of scripture literally and others we seem to interpret. It seems random to the onlooker. However there is system and science behind it. This is a blog post that tries to describe the basics in simple words, easy to apply yourself.

There are three types of Bible translations:

1. word for word i.e. literal translations (‘formal equivalents’) [e.g. NASB, KJV, Amplified, ESV, NRSV]

2. interpretative thought for thought translations (‘dynamic equivalents’) [e.g. NIV, HCS, TEV, (NLT)]

3. paraphrased translations (a very loose translation) [e.g. LB, Message Bible]

They are not all used for the same purposes. Bible translations that fall under 1 are best used for Bible study. Bible translations that fall under 2 are used mostly for reading. Those categorized under 3 are sometimes interesting to get a new angle on matters previously read or studied in another translation but are unsuitable for Bible studies or daily Bible reading.

When studying the Bible, all text needs to undergo the same process of interpretation. (At the end of it, some will turn out to be literal, other parts may turn out to need interpretation.)

How to interpret the Bible:

A. The meaning is determined by the context.

1. list all possible meanings

2. historic + literary context eliminates impossible + improbable meanings.

Here an example of how to do that with the word “trunk”.

1. all possible meanings: car boot, suitcase, phone call, tree, elephant nose

Let’s assume it is part of a Jane Austin novel (which play in the 1800’s in England).

2. process of eliminating the impossible:

– trunk call (the phone was not invented then)

– car boot ( they still had carriages)

3. Process of eliminating the improbable:

– elephant trunk (it might be possible as India was English colony, but it is highly unlikely)

The use of the work within the sentence helps us eliminate even more options: “and she folded her clothes carefully and placed them in a trunk.”

  • eliminates the tree trunk and the elephant trunk completely.

This leaves us with only ONE meaning of trunk in this context: “suitcase”.

B. Word study

1. meanings of words change over time (they undergo a historical development)

2. meanings in the here and now might differ from their original meaning greatly

3. etymology of words can help or mislead us.

We need to look at three aspects:

1. history of the word.

2. historical context (author and audience in the original).

3. literary context.

one example: the word ‘nice’ used to mean ‘ignorant’, now it means ‘pleasant’.

If you are required to do in depth word study on a regular basis, getting a good Bible Study Software like ‘Mounces Complete Expository Dictionary of OT + NT’; e-sword software; or Olive Tree, will be a helpful starting point.

When you look at any Biblical text, it has 2 audiences:

the original audience that the author wrote to (there & then),

and the contemporary/modern audience (here & now).

We must always look at the original audience first, before we ponder over the meaning for the contemporary audience.

Any interpretation of the Bible intends to be a bridge between the “there & then” and the “here & now”.

Any good interpretation discovers the meaning and intention of the author in the text. A good interpretation tries to get information OUT OF the text. We call this ‘exegesis’.

Any bad interpretation does the opposite. It imposes the readers invention/or wanted meaning, on the text, i.e. tries to read stuff INTO the text. We call this ‘eisegesis’.

Sources of authority for interpretation are:

1. scripture itself (this is the highest authority and is the only infallible authority)

2. tradition, reason, experience (all these are important for interpretation but are fallible.

The only things that help protect you (besides the Holy Spirit guiding you) from misinterpretation are to remember that you have to

– be conscious of your traditions

– remember that reasoning has limitations

– remember that experience is always subject to interpretation and thus is prone to mistakes.

The blog posts that follow will allow you to try out two different methods of getting the most out of your daily Bible study.

May God bless you abundantly and enrich your study of His word, whilst making you vigilant not to be deceived by wrong teachers of our times.

The Authority of the Bible

The following scriptures and notes are not intended to give an all inclusive or exclusive view on the matter. However it is an attempt to lead you in studying the Word of God i.e. the Bible; and allow GOD to speak to youexplain to you and draw you closer.

My challenge to you is this:

Read 1 to 3 scriptures of these daily and meditate on what they mean, what implications they have for your life and how you could allow them to change your life in a practical way.

(Please take note that though most verses are the same, some verses might shift one or two in numbering as they are taken from a German Bible.)

The Basics:

Matthew 4:4; Isaiah 55:10+11; John 1:1+14; 1 Tim. 2:4;

The Bible is the basis for our faith. Knowing what it contains and what that content means will deepen our understanding…strengthen our convictions… lead us to make decisions, take positions and act upon what we believe.

1. The Word of God is infallible

2 Tim. 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:20-21;

Belief in the Bible and its infallibility gives us a guideline to life.

2. The Word of God is/contains the thoughts of God

Isaiah 55:7-11

The Word of God and God are one. As God never changes, His word does neither. i.e. the authority and timeliness remain.

3. The Word of God has strength and gives strength

Romans 10:17; Hebrews 4:12;

4. The Word of God provides spiritual life

2 Peter 1:3-4; Psalm 119:89+160; Matthew 24:35; John 8:31-32+37;

The Word of God provides us with core values in a time of chaos regarding definite values and morale. From beginning to end it is truth.

5. The Word of God effects:

A. Faith (Romans 10:17)

B. New Birth (i.e. conversion to God) (1 Peter 1:23 describes this experience)

C. Physical Healing (Psalm 107:20; Proverbs 4:20-22)

D. Victory over sin and guilt (Psalm 119:11;) (to answer the question of what Christians may or may not do study: 1 Corinthians 10:31; Colossians 3:17; we find two principles: 1. To do all things to honour God. 2. To do everything in the name of Christ and say thanks to God through Him) (1 Corinthians 3:16-17)

E. Victory over Satan (Ephesians 6:17; 1 John 2:14; 1 Corinthians 2:11-12; Revelation 22:18+19)

6. How does God speak to us?

– Personally (Genesis 3:8-9)

– Through prophets (Isaiah 1:2)

– Jesus (Luke 5:1)

7. What do we do with the Word of God?

– Listen/Hear/Absorb (Acts 17:11)

– Understand (Matthew 13:23)

– Love (Psalm 119:47)

– Look forward to it in joy (Psalm 119:16)

– Treasure (Psalm 119:11)

– Trust (Psalm 119:42+74+81)

– Follow (Psalm 119:9)

Revelation 22:18-19

 

Comparison Christianity and Islam Part 3

The idea behind this post is to educate. Further comparisons will follow in similar fashion.

(Information will partially be taken from: thereligionofpeace.com . That is not to say that I agree with all of their content, but I judge the content in this case as unbiased and a good representation of it.)

Differences Between 
Early Muslims and Early Christians

Muhammad’s Companions…

Jesus’ Disciples…

Lived as warriors.

Lived like harmless hippies.

Slew and persecuted religious minorities.

Were slain and persecuted
as a religious minority.

Emphasis on Jihad (the way of Muhammad)

“He who fights that Allah’s word should
be superior fights in Allah’s cause”
(Bukhari 53:355)

Emphasis on Evangelism (the way of Jesus)

“Go ye into all the world and preach
the gospel to every creature”

(Matthew 15:16)

Attacked and conquered the populations in
parts of 28 modern countries in just the first
three decades following Muhammad’s death.

Did not resort to violence of any sort,
despite tremendous persecution.

Declared holy war on the people of five
major world religions in just the first
100 years following Muhammad’s death.

Went centuries without declaring ‘holy war’.

Plundered and lived off the wealth of others.

Gave away their possessions to those in need.
(Acts 2:44-45)

Captured and enslaved non-Muslim people.

Considered themselves to be slaves of others.

Waged war to keep members from leaving
the religion.  Put apostates to death.

No record of aggression toward apostates.

Muhammad’s own family members quickly
fell into armed warfare against each other.

Jesus’ disciples never resorted to violence
against one another (or anyone else).

First 240 Years:
11 of the first 32 caliphs were
murdered by fellow Muslims.

First 240 Years: 
14 of the first 25 popes were martyred by
pagans (none by fellow Christians).

Caliphs were polygamous and maintained  harems of hundreds of captured sex slaves.

Popes were expected to be celibate.

Islamic mosques sustained by taxes forced from subjugated non-Muslims (the jizya).

Christian churches sustained
by voluntary tithes from Christians.

Comparison Christianity and Islam Part 2

The idea behind this post is to educate. Further comparisons will follow in similar fashion.

(Information will partially be taken from: thereligionofpeace.com . That is not to say that I agree with all of their content, but I judge the content in this case as unbiased and a good representation of it.)

Differences Between Muhammad and Jesus

Muhammad…

Jesus…

Said Allah hates those who don’t accept Islam.
(Qur’an 30:4, 3:32, 22:38)

Said God loves everyone.
(John 3:16)

“I have been commanded to fight
against people till they testify that there
is no god but Allah, and that Muhammad
is the messenger of Allah”

(Muslim 1:33)

“He who lives by the sword
will die by the sword.”

(Matthew 26:52)

Stoned women for adultery.
(Muslim 4206)

“Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.”
(John 8:7)

Permitted stealing from unbelievers.
(Bukhari 44:668, Ibn Ishaq 764)

“Thou shalt not steal.”
(Matthew 19:18)

Permitted lying.
(Sahih Muslim 6303, Bukhari 49:857)

“Thou shalt not bear false witness.”
(Matthew 19:18)

Owned and traded slaves.
(Sahih Muslim 3901)

Neither owned nor traded slaves.

Beheaded 800 Jewish men and boys.
(Sahih Muslim 4390)

Beheaded no one.

Murdered those who insulted him.
(Bukhari 56:369, 4:241)

Preached forgiveness.
(Matthew 18:21-22, 5:38)

“If then anyone transgresses
the prohibition against you,
Transgress ye likewise against him”
(Qur’an 2:194)

“If someone strikes you on the right
cheek, turn to him the other also.”
(Matthew 5:39)

Jihad in the way of Allah elevates one’s position in Paradise by a hundred fold.
(Muslim 4645)

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for
they will be called Sons of God”
(Matthew 5:9)

Married 13 wives and kept sex slaves.
(Bukhari 5:268, Qur’an 33:50)

Was celibate.

Slept with a 9-year-old child.
(Sahih Muslim 3309, Bukhari 58:236)

Did not have sex with children.

Ordered the murder of women.
(Ibn Ishaq 819, 995)

Never harmed a woman.

“O you who believe!  Fight those of the
unbelievers who are near to you
and let them find in you hardness.”

(Qur’an 9:123)

“Blessed are the meek, for
they shall inherit the earth.”

(Matthew 5:5)

Ordered 65 military campaigns
and raids in his last 10 years.
(Ibn Ishaq )

Ordered no military campaigns, nor
offered any approval of war or violence.

Killed captives taken in battle.
(Ibn Ishaq 451)

Never took captives.
Never killed anyone.

Encouraged his men to rape enslaved women.
(Abu Dawood 2150, Qur’an 4:24)

Never encouraged rape.
Never enslaved women.

Demanded captured slaves and
a fifth of all other loot taken in war.
(Qur’an 8:41)

“The Son of Man came not
to be served, but to serve.

(Matthew 20:28)

Was never tortured, but tortured others.
(Muslim 4131, Ibn Ishaq 436, 595, 734, 764)

Suffered torture, but never tortured anyone.

“And fight them until there is no more persecution and religion is only for Allah”
(Qur’an 8:39)

“Love your enemies and pray
for those who persecute you

(Matthew 5:44)

Blessed the brutal murder of a half-blind man
(al-Tabari 1440)

Healed a blind man
(Mark 8:28)

Ordered a slave to build the very pulpit
from which he preached Islam.
(Bukhari 47:743)

Washed his disciples feet.
(John 13:5)

What are the Greatest Commandments?
“Belief in Allah and Jihad in His cause”
(Muslim 1:149)

What are the Greatest Commandments?
“Love God and love thy neighbor as thyself.”
(Matthew 22:34-40)

Demanded the protection of armed bodyguards, even in a house of worship
(Qur’an 4:102)

Chastised anyone attempting
to defend him with force.
(John 18:10-12)

Died fat and wealthy from what was
taken from others in war or
demanded from others in tribute.

Demanded nothing for himself.
Died without possessions.

Advocated crucifying others.
(Qur’an 5:33, Muslim 16:4131)

Was crucified himself.

According to his followers:
Had others give their lives for him.
(Sahih Muslim 4413)

According to his followers:
Gave his life for others.
(John 18:11 and elsewhere)

Comparison Christianity and Islam Part 1

The idea behind this post is to educate. Further comparisons will follow in similar fashion.

(Information will partially be taken from: thereligionofpeace.com . That is not to say that I agree with all of their content, but I judge the content in this case as unbiased and a good representation of it.)

Differences Between 
Islamic Teaching and Christianity

The Qur’an

The Bible

External sources (the Hadith and Sira) necessary for translating the Qur’an

Historical context contained
within the text of the Bible

Must know Arabic in order to “fully understand” the Qur’an (according to Muslim apologists)

Universal.  Can be translated into other languages without excessive commentary.

Chronological progression of the
Quran is from peace to violence.

Chronological progression of the
Bible is from violence to peace.

The words ‘torture’ and ‘punishment’ appear six
times more often than in the New Testament.

The word ‘love’ appears five times more often
in the New Testament than in the Qur’an,

Contains not a single original moral value.

The ‘Sermon on the Mount’ and others.

Suffering is an excuse for violent revenge
and establishment of Islam by force

“And slay them wherever ye find them, and drive them out of the places whence they drove you out, for persecution [of Muslims] is worse than slaughter [of non-believers]…and fight them until persecution is no more, and religion is for Allah.” 
(Qur’an 2:191)

Suffering builds character

“We also rejoice in our sufferings,
because we know that suffering
produces perseverance; perseverance,
character; and character, hope”

(Romans 5:4)

Emphasis on this World

“And Allah has made you heirs to their land
and their dwellings and their property”

(Qur’an 33:27)

Emphasis on the Next

“Mine is not a kingdom of this world”
(John 18:36, see also Luke 14:33)

Kill, convert or subjugate Christians and Jews.
(Qur’an 9:29)

Share one’s faith with gentleness and respect.
(1 Peter 3:15)

Martyrs as Killers

“Allah hath purchased of the believers their persons and their goods; for theirs (in return) is the garden (of Paradise): they fight in His cause, and slay and are slain”
(Qur’an 9:111)

Martyrs as Martyrs

“As it is written, For thy sake we are
killed all the day long; we are
counted as sheep for the slaughter”
(Romans 8:36)

Killing Apostates

“They but wish that ye should reject Faith, as they do, and thus be on the same footing (as they): But take not friends from their ranks until they flee in the way of Allah (From what is forbidden). But if they turn renegades, seize them and slay them wherever ye find them”
(Qur’an 4:89, also Bukhari 52:260, 83:37…)

Letting God Judge Apostates

“For we know Him that has said,
‘Vengeance belongs unto me, I will
recompense,’ says the Lord.  And again,
‘The Lord shall judge his people'”
(Hebrews 10:25-30)

Punishment

“Let not compassion move you
from carrying out God’s law…”
(Qur’an 24:2)

Mercy

“Love is patient.  Love is kind…
It keeps no record of wrongs”
(1 Corinthians 13:4-5)

Charity and Non-Believers

Mercy toward fellow Muslims – ruthlessness toward unbelievers.  Muslims are warned not to befriend those outside the faith.  They must even ensure that their charity tithe (zakat) does not go toward the needy of other religions.
(Qur’an 48:29, 3:28, Sharia)

Charity and Non-Believers

Christians are specifically told that even
those who hate them are entitled to
kindness and charity.  They should be loved
and cared for as surely as any fellow believer.
(Mark 10:25-37)

The Qur’an does not command husbands
to love their wives, but it does give men
permission to beat disobedient women.
(Qur’an 4:34, Sahih Muslim 2127)

“Husbands, love your wives and
do not be harsh with them.”
(No permission to beat women)
(Colossians 3:19)

Explicitly allows Muslim men to rape their female slaves, even those already married.
(Qur’an 4:24, 70:29-30, 23:5-6…)

Tells masters and slaves to serve
each other as if serving God.
(Ephesians 6:7-9)

Muhammad is the messenger
of Allah. And those who are with him
are ruthless to the unbelievers”
(Qur’an 48:29)

“Do good to them that hate you”
(Luke 6:27)

Allah wills those that stray and are lost
(Qur’an 16:93)

God wants all people saved
(1 Timothy 2:4)

Warns Against Questioning Faith.
(Qur’an 5:101-102)

Welcomes Intellectual Challenge.
(1 Peter 3:15)

Violence as Virtue

“Fighting is prescribed for you, and ye
dislike it.  But it is possible that ye
dislike a thing which is good for you, and
that ye love a thing which is bad for you.
But Allah knoweth, and ye know not.”
(Qur’an 2:216)

Violence as Sin

“Do not take revenge, my friends, but
leave room for God’s wrath, for it is written:
‘It is mine to avenge; I will repay,’ says the Lord. On the contrary: ‘If your enemy
is hungry,  feed him… ‘”
(Romans 12:19-20)

Hell for unbelief.
Good deeds count for naught
(Qur’an 18:102-107)

Hell for bad deeds and the
failure to do what is right
(Romans 2:6-8, Matthew 16:27, Matthew 25:41-45)

Judging

“Strive against the disbelievers and the hypocrites!  Be harsh with them…”
(Qur’an 9:73)

Judge Not

“For when you pass judgment on another person, you condemn yourself…”
(Romans 2:1)

Taking wealth from others

“Allah promiseth you much
booty that ye will capture…”
(Qur’an 48:20)

Working for and giving wealth to others

“The thief must no longer steal but must
work hard and do what is good with his
own hands, so that he might have
something to give to the needy.”

(Ephesians 4:28)

Calls down Allah’s curse on Christians
and those of other religions.
(Qur’an 9:30)

Calls down God’s blessing on
those who curse Christians.
(Matthew 5:44)

Arrogance & Privilege

“Ye are the best of peoples,
evolved for mankind”

(Qur’an 3:110)

Humility & Servitude

“If anyone wants to be first, he must make himself last of all and servant of all.”
(Mark 9:35)

“O you who believe! do not take My
enemy and your enemy for friends:
Would you offer them love while they deny what has come to you of the truth?
(Qur’an 60:1)

“Love your enemies…”
(Luke 6:27)

The truth about Halloween

Halloween is a much known festival in Germany today. But where did it originally come from?

On the night of October 31st, people dress up as ghosts, mummies, witches or demons.

This tradition comes from an ancient Celtic pagan’s festival known as Samhein. People thought that the ghosts of the dead come back to visit the living and haunt them on this day. They believed the ghosts could kill them, make them sick or bring bad fortune to their families. To calm Samhein, the god of death, witches and fortune-tellers went from house to house and demanded an offering, sometimes even a human sacrifice for Samhein.

They carried animal masks and lanterns with candles made from the human fat of prior sacrifices. The beet represented the ghosts that cursed the living. If people didn’t give a sacrifice, they cursed the house and marked it with the blood of an animal.

From this belief originated the slogan `trick or treat´. This means, that either you give something to please the person, or they play a trick on you.

When this tradition came to America the beet was replaced by the pumpkin.

October 31st also is the New Years Day of the witch calendar and one of the most important witch Sabbaths. During this night, still today, human sacrifices are made in the US and Australia.

Halloween is more than a spooky fun festival. It is still today a demonic ritual.

GOD has a positive answer

 YOU SAY   GOD SAYS   BIBLE VERSES  
You say:  ‘It’s impossible’ God says:   All things are possible (Luke 18:27)
You say:  ‘I’m too tired’ God says:  I will give you rest (Matthew 11:28-30)
You say:  ‘Nobody really loves me’ God says:  I love you (John 3:1   6 & John 3:34 )
You say:  ‘I can’t go on’ God says:  My grace is sufficient (II Corinthians 12:9 & Psalm 91:15)
You say:  ‘I can’t figure things out’ God says:  I will direct your steps (Proverbs 3:5-   6)
You say:  ‘I can’t do it’ God says:  You can do all things ( Philippians 4:13)
You say:  ‘I’m not able’ God says:  I am able (II Corinthians 9:8)
You say: ‘It’s not worth it’ God says:  It will be worth it (Roman 8:28 )
You say:  ‘I can’t forgive myself’ God says:  I Forgive you (I John 1:9 & Romans 8:1)
You say:  ‘I can’t manage’ God says:  I will supply all your needs ( Philippians 4:19)
You say:  ‘I’m afraid’ God says:  I have not given you a spirit of fear (II Timothy 1:7)
You say:  ‘I’m always worried and frustrated’ God says:  Cast all your cares on ME (I Peter 5:7)
You say:  ‘I’m not smart enough’ God says:  I give you wisdom (I Corinthians 1:30)
You say:  ‘I feel all alone’ God says:  I will never leave you or forsake you (Hebrews 13:5)

Uniqueness of the Bible

1. The Uniqueness of its Composition

The Bible is comprised of 66 separate books, and it was written over a period of at least 1.500 years by more than 40 authors who for the most part didn’t know each other personally.

The writers of the Bible came from different social and occupational backgrounds (for example Moses – political leader, educated in Pharao’s palace; Joshua – general; Solomon – king; Amos – shepherd; Nehemiah – cup-bearer; Daniel – politician; Peter – fisherman; Luke – physician; Matthew – tax-collector).

The authors of the Bible wrote in completely different geographic environments and under different circumstances (for example Moses – in the desert; Jeremiah – in a prison; David – in the mountains and in his palace; Paul – in prison; Luke – during his journeys; John – during his exil on Patmos).

They wrote in different states of mind – one in a state of great joy, the other in a state of mourning and despair.

The Bible was composed on three different continents (Asia, Africa and Europe) and in three languages (Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek)

2. The Uniqueness of its Thematic Unity

Unity in its objective: Although the Bible was written by about 40 different authors during a period of at least 1.500 years and although these writers lived on three different continents and belonged to various cultures, the Bible has a unifying objective. The main theme is to give answers to these basic questions:

Who is God?

Who is man?

Is there a possibility for a relationship between God and man, and if so – how?

The Bible wants to lead man to God (cf. John 20:31 and 2 Timothy 3:14-17).

Unity in its contents: The whole book is about one central figure – Jesus Christ. Basically, the complete Old Testament points to this Person, be it through metaphors or be it through direct prophecies. The New Testament shows us the fulfillment of these prophecies and the meaning and the consequences of the coming of Christ.

3. The Uniqueness of its Relevance

Although the Bible is already many centuries old, it is still read regularly and with great interest by very many people.

The Bible is a book that has been relevant in every epoch of world history – whether in times of war or peace, in the Dark Ages or in our modern technological age. Millions of people have found nourishment, help, and encouragement in this book.

The Bible is the only book in the world that is read by people from all walks of life and from every age group.

4. The Uniqueness of its Circulation

The Bible is one of the first books that have ever been translated. About 250 B.C. the Old Testament was translated into the Greek language (the Septuagint).

The Bible was the first major book that was printed – in form of the Latin Vulgate on Gutenberg’s press.

It is the most-translated and most-spread book in the world (in 2002, the Bible had been translated into 2287 languages: the complete Bible into 392 languages, the New Testament into 1012 languages and single books of the Bible into 883 languages), with a still increasing tendency.

5. The Uniqueness of its Survival

It has survived time: Although the Bible was written on perishable material and therefore had to be copied by hand for many centuries until the art of printing had been invented, neither its accuracy nor its existence has suffered.

It has survived persecution: The Bible has withstood the most malicious onslaughts of its enemies like no other book. For centuries people have tried to burn, ban, and outlaw the Bible.

It has survived criticism: An army of rationalists arose who thought up the wildest and most intense attacks against the Bible. But nevertheless, the Bible has been distributed more, read more and cherished more than any other book.

6. The Uniqueness of its Literary Character

According to Arthur Brisbane (a non-Christian), the Bible contains brilliant examples of great literature in any form: lyric poetry – the Psalms, epic poetry – Genesis; dramatic poetry – Job; historic narrative art – the Books of Samuel, Kings and Chronicles; rural idyll – Ruth; patriotism – Esther and Daniel; practical wisdom – Proverbs; philosophie – Ecclesiastes; moving depth – Isaiah; short stories – the Gospels; letters – the various Epistles of the New Testament; thrilling mysticism – the Book of Revelation.

A long literary stream of books inspired by the Bible testifies to the influence of the Bible on the world literature.

7. The Uniqueness of its Moral Character

The absolute unique moral character of this book forces man to make a choice, a decision. It seems that nobody can remain untouched or neutral in the presence of the Bible.

For that reason is the Bible not only the most-sold, most-spread, most-translated and most-read, but also the most-hated book in the world.

But it is just as much the most-cherished book in the world. Other books may represent certain ideals. But practice proves the impossibility of lifting fallen man up to the level of these ideals, because the power is missing that only the Bible seems to possess. The Bible brings the impossible about by bringing us into contact with Jesus Christ who does not “repair” fallen man, but who has died for them. And fallen man has died in and with Christ, and has become a completely new human being, a new creature in the risen Christ. Scripture tells us that everybody, who truly has accepted Christ in faith, can rest in this assurance. – The biblical answer to the moral problem of the modern man is a personal, spiritual new birth, an actual inner change – not the conversion to a system, but to a Person, and the sincere, believing trust in the risen Lord Jesus Christ

8. The Uniqueness Of Its Accuracy

The Bible itself tells us how it was written: “All Scripture is inspired by God” (2 Timothy 3:16). Men “moved by the Holy Spirit spoke from God” (2 Peter 1:21). The Greek word for inspired, theopneustos, means “God-breathed.” The Holy Spirit carried men along, moving and guiding them as they wrote in their own words what God wanted them to say. Thus we have verbal inspiration, because the words of the original text were inspired by God.

Many indicators for the accuracy of the Bible can be found in the fields of science, such as astronomy, physics, medicine, or biology. You will find many examples to support this statement if you follow this link: Scientific Evidence for the Accuracy of the Bible

No historic fact in the Bible ever has been shown to be in error. For more information on this claim, please visit the following link: Historical Evidence for the Accuracy of the Bible

One of the strongest objective evidences of biblical inspiration is the phenomenon of fulfilled prophecy. The Bible is essentially unique among the religious books of mankind in this respect. – Prophetical Evidence for the Accuracy of the Bible

(from: http://thewaytogod.info/e.uniqueness.bible.html)

That’s my KING and SAVIOUR

The incomparable Christ

He came from the throne of the Father to the womb of a woman. He put on

humanity that we might put on divinity. He became Son of Man that we might

become sons of God. He was born in a supernatural way, lived in poverty and

was reared in obscurity. He had neither wealth nor influence, yet the wisdom of

men has never matched His wisdom. Never has a man spoken like this man. His

family was inconspicuous and uninfluential. In infancy He startled a king. As a

boy, He stunned theologians with His knowledge and wisdom for He was taugh

of God. In manhood, He ruled the elements and quieted the raging sea. He

healed the multitudes without medicine. And fed thousands from a boy’s lunch.

Even demons obeyed Him and He gave back life to those who died. He never

wrote a book, yet none of the libraries of the world can contain the books that

have been written about Him. He never wrote a song, yet He has furnished the

theme of more songs than all song writers combined. He never founded a

college, yet all the colleges together cannot boast of as many students as He has.

He never marshaled an army, yet no leader has ever had more volunteers. Great

men have come and gone yet He lives all. Herod could not kill Him. Satan could

not tempt Him to sin. Death could not destroy Him. The grave could not hold

Him. He laid aside His purple robe for a peasant’s gown. He was rich yet for our

sakes He became poor. He slept in another’s manger. He rode on another’s

donkey. He was buried in another’s grave. He conquered death and rose on the

third day as He said He would. He ascended into heaven and is now at the right

hand of the throne of God. One day He will return with power and great glory to

judge the world when every knee shall bow to Him and every tongue shall

confess Him as Lord. His friends gladly. But enemies seeking for a place to hide

from His face. He is the perfect one. The only one who can satisfy the soul. He

gives everlasting life to those who love Him. He is altogether lovely. But best of

all, He is my Savior.

(from a brochure of the Faith, Prayer and Tract League)